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Searching for Anna

After all this time? Always.

George Waters & George Brody

The two Georges.

There is George Waters, Anna's father, who worked as a physician in San Francisco around the time of Anna's birth. Born in the Philippines to medical missionary parents, Waters would spend time in a Japanese concentration camp until it was liberated by U.S. Marines as World War II came to a close. He eventually graduated from Princeton and, at the age of 22, accepted a teaching post at the American Farm School in Thessaloniki, Greece. There he met Michaele Benedict, then married with two young children. Waters and Benedict would later marry in New York in 1964. Three years later Anna Christian Waters became his one and only daughter.

Sometime in 1967, while treating a woman who was dying of cancer, Waters met George Brody, a man he would find increasingly fascinating. Benedict, in her written account of her daughter's disappearance documents Waters' unstable mental state.

She writes "January, 1969: George is making the rounds of the somewhat reduced circle of our friends, telling them I'm in love with his self-styled psychic friend and begging them to make me write letters of apology to same."

Brody was a murky figure whose true identity is still something of a mystery, French says. As Waters and Brody grew closer, Waters' behavior became increasingly erratic.

Not long after, Waters was diagnosed with paranoid Schizophrenia.

He eventually left and went to live with Brody. Years later, in January of 1982, just two weeks after Brody succumbed to cancer, Waters drank cyanide and died in a Tenderloin hotel, according to a San Francisco coroner's report.

It did not take long for some involved in the case to suspect Brody and Waters of having something to do with Anna's disappearance. Today Douglas French believes that one of the two men were likely involved.

"It looks more and more likely that Anna's birth father had something to do with her disappearance," French said. "He was capable of doing some pretty bizarre stuff."

French noted that Waters began taking out numerous life insurance policies on himself, with Brody as the beneficiary on some and Anna as the beneficiary on others.

"This maneuver occurred right around the time she disappeared," French said.

Among Waters' papers was a note, titled simply "Plan." It is numbered with four points, some words are illegible, but French believes the note ties Waters to the crime. In parentheses after the first point it reads, "Jan. 1973."

Joe Ford, Anna's stepfather, spent time watching Waters and Brody in the years after Anna's disappearance. In one instance, according to French, Ford mailed a letter accusing Waters of having something to do with the disappearance and listened through a hotel room wall to the reaction. Waters reportedly said, "I'm glad the tot is dead." Joe Ford's Investigation

Source: Three decades later family still searches for Anna

The weirder things

It is estimated that in the summer of 1967, Dr. George Waters met George Brody while attending to his sick (girlf)friend Margaret Kukoda.

About a year after Anna was born, George Waters left Anna and her mother, and moved in with George Brody.

The two Georges lived at cheap, shady motels. Meanwhile, Dr. George Waters usually worked 2 – 4 jobs at a time, so he was making enough money. George Brody hasn’t worked a day in his life.

Whenever George Waters would get home at around 7 or 8 pm, George Brody would insist they go from diner to diner, and George Waters always followed.
It is assumed George Brody had even more power over George Waters because of his lack of sleep.

George Brody was a selfproclaimed psychic sort of person, who had a huge interest in numerology. 
He convinced George Waters and Anna's mom to change Anna's name to "Anna Christian Eifee Waters".
Eifee, a word that probably has no meaning, but apparently in numerology adds up to 27, as did the name Brody.
This, along with the note found titled "the plan", could make one believe either or both Georges had something to do with Anna going missing.